The Fallout of Cleveland Browns QB Colt McCoy’s Concussion

The concussion that Cleveland Browns quarterback Colt McCoy sustained on Thursday night is becoming big news, thanks in large part to the game being played on national television.

The NFL has been investigating the Browns to determine whether or not the team followed the proper procedures in checking McCoy for a concussion on the sidelines. Sources have told ESPN that the Browns didn’t perform the SCAT2 concussion test (sport concussion assessment tool) on McCoy before letting him go back into the game. Additionally, the team didn’t even perform any kind of concussion test on the quarterback until the following morning.

Chris Mortensen of ESPN has also predicted that the mishandling of McCoy’s concussion could finally be the example the NFL needed to require independent neurologists at games.

On the other side of the ball, Pittsburgh Steelers linebacker James Harrison could be facing a suspension for the helmet-to-helmet hit that gave McCoy the concussion. Harrison is no stranger to receiving punishment from the league for the way that he plays, and after his hit on McCoy, it’s time that he was given a suspension. He obviously has had little regard for the fines the league has handed down, so perhaps a suspension in the middle of a division race might do the trick.

Head coach Pat Shurmur insists that the team followed the correct protocol on the sidelines when it came to evaluating Colt McCoy. Allegedly, he didn’t display signs of even having a concussion until after the game, but McCoy also told his father that he didn’t remember coming back into the game.

Suffice it to say, this situation seems far from over and could finally spur the league into adding extra precautions for players who have possible head injuries.

Topics: Cleveland Browns, Colt McCoy, Concussion, James Harrison, Pat Shurmur, Pittsburgh Steelers

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  • The Big G

    Imagine it’s 2012, and the Browns have somehow managed to parlay to No. 1 picks into Andrew Luck. It’s late in another lousy season and Luck gets similarly drilled. No way does Shurmur put him back in. So my question is, why does he treat McCoy like he’s disposable? Harrison could have easily gotten another shot at Colt while he was still groggy, and who knows what would have happened.

  • The Big G

    Imagine it’s 2012, and the Browns have somehow managed to parlay to No. 1 picks into Andrew Luck. It’s late in another lousy season and Luck gets similarly drilled. No way does Shurmur put him back in. So my question is, why does he treat McCoy like he’s disposable? Harrison could have easily gotten another shot at Colt while he was still groggy, and who knows what would have happened.

  • fansince70

    lets give Seneca a shot against Cards, and give Colt a day off to clear the cob webs. The coaches now a days need to be more medical saavy. As a career paramedic and Rn, knowledge is power, Colt should not have been let back in, he was, who did assessment and what level of medical clearance?

  • fansince70

    i’ll make a wild guess and say that most NFL coaches have very little if any medical expertise, i would know, I used to teach CPR to one of the west coast squads trainers, that has to change! It isnt 1967 anymore

  • fansince70

    it takes a good 10-15 mins to thoroughly assess a guy like Colt after he was pummeled by a guy like harrison. Observation abd reassess after 5 min intervals etc. neuro function, questions, buzzing bee feeling in the head etc…

  • fansince70

    lets give Seneca a shot against Cards, and give Colt a day off to clear the cob webs. The coaches now a days need to be more medical saavy. As a career paramedic and Rn, knowledge is power, Colt should not have been let back in, he was, who did assessment and what level of medical clearance?

  • fansince70

    i’ll make a wild guess and say that most NFL coaches have very little if any medical expertise, i would know, I used to teach CPR to one of the west coast squads trainers, that has to change! It isnt 1967 anymore

  • fansince70

    it takes a good 10-15 mins to thoroughly assess a guy like Colt after he was pummeled by a guy like harrison. Observation abd reassess after 5 min intervals etc. neuro function, questions, buzzing bee feeling in the head etc…